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Quinton Old Rectory Garden

Quinton

A tranquil and thoughtfully-designed private garden.

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Althorp

Northampton

Althorp House was built in 1508 and has been run by the Spencer family ever since. Charles, Ninth Earl Spencer has been in charge for 29 of the House’s 500-year history but has striven in that time to make a positive difference, by taking an uncompromising approach to the continuing wellbeing of Althorp. There are large gardens to explore and they also hold a range of festivals. The house is home to one of Europe’s finest private collections of furniture, paintings and ceramics, each intriguing room of this magnificent family home has a fascinating story of its own. There is also a cafe and gift shop. Althorp Estate is subject to limited opening times so check prior to your visit.

National Trust's Lyveden

Lyveden

At the heart of Lyveden is the Elizabethan lodge and moated garden. Beyond you will discover Sir Thomas Tresham’s orchard, abandoned in 1605. Now restored it is home to a variety of heritage trees; apple, pear, damson, plum and cherry.

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Delapre Park and Delapré Abbey Walled Garden

Northampton

The Abbey is set within the remains of the formal and semi-formal gardens which were once the pride and joy of the Tate and Bouverie families. There’s a large walled garden, superb specimen trees in the understated arboretum; the hidden remains of a splendid water garden, and the south lawn which stretches out to the ha-ha, which separates the lawn from the 500 acres of the wider parkland and the golf course beyond. There’s so much to see from the colourful flowers to the ancient trees and mature shrubs carefully tended by the gardener, grounds maintenance teams and of course the many volunteers. In the wider parkland, Visitos can enjoy a stroll around Delapre Lake and see the local wildlife on the way.

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Deene Park

Near Corby

Elegant country manor and estate with tea room.

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Coton Manor Garden

Coton

This peaceful ten acre garden occupies a hillside position extending down from the 17th century manor house, constructed of mellow Northamptonshire stone. Landscaped on different levels, it comprises a series of distinctive smaller gardens, providing variety and interest throughout the season, and enhanced by flowing streams, fountains and ponds. Beyond the confines of the garden, there is a magical five acre bluebell wood and a colourful wildflower meadow at its best in June & July.

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Elton Hall & Gardens

Cambridgeshire

An immaculate collection of formal gardens.

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Lamport Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Although the size and location of the gardens have remained the same since they were first laid out, the design has changed significantly over the generations. In the 17th century, Sir Thomas Isham entrusted the development of the gardens to his land agent, Gilbert Clerke, while he was away in Europe. The surrounding banks and large wrought iron gates survive from this time. One of the main changes in the 18th century was in 1750, when Sir Edmund planted box edgings to seven groups of shrubs. All but one of these ‘rooms’ would later be removed in the twentieth century. It was the keen eye of Mary, Lady Isham in the 1820s and later the passion of her son Sir Charles, which gave the gardens their present layout. Sir Charles planted the Irish yews to create the Eagle Walk, so-called because it led to an aviary of eagle owls. He also created the Italian garden in front of the Drawing Room windows and planted the climbing wisteria which still thrives today. Sir Charles’ pride and joy however was his remarkable rockery. He began work on the rockery in 1847. Standing some 24 foot high, 90 foot long and 47 foot wide, it was built right up against the Hall so that Sir Charles could see it from his bedroom window. It was made to look like a miniature world, with tiny crevices and caves, and planted dwarf trees. The rockery was populated with gnomes around 1874 - the world’s first garden gnomes! - and they remained there happily until the death of Sir Charles when, according to legend, they were shot at with air rifles by his daughters! Although most were lost, one survived, and today can be seen inside the Hall. Today the gardens include extensive herbaceous borders and shrubbery walks containing some rare and interesting plants, providing year round interest. The Walled Garden was replanted in 2010 and is full of unusual tall perennial plants, many sourced from Piet Oudolf’s nursery in the Netherlands. A vibrant array of colour and variety of plants are intersected by gravelled pathways with hidden doors and relaxing benches to be found. To the south-west of the Church lies the corner spinney which has been brought back to life with the restoration of the paths and a summerhouse. The planting has been carefully chosen to complement the masses of snowdrops and other bulbs and to remain in keeping with the essentially wild nature of the woodland garden.

Kelmarsh Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Within the 18th century setting, the gardens that visitors see at Kelmarsh Hall today are largely inspired by Nancy Lancaster. She extended her interior style of shabby chic charm into the gardens and drafted in the garden designer of her day, the talented Norah Lindsay, to help. Around the Hall the landscape architect Geoffrey Jellicoe laid out a formal terrace.

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National Trust's Canons Ashby

Daventry

A tranquil Tudor manor house set in rare terraced gardens, with the 'antient' Dryden family at its heart.

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Boughton House

Kettering

Boughton House is often referred to as ‘The English Versailles’ and is home to a large collection of furniture, tapestries, art, and other fine pieces of history. Access to the house is available and the gardens have recently been renovated and redesigned.

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Sulgrave Manor & Garden

Banbury

Formal gardens arranged around a cluster of stone buildings.

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Thenford Arboretum

Oxford

The arboretum is spread out over 70 acres, featuring a collection of more than 3000 different trees and shrubs. Extensive herbaceous borders, water gardens, an alpine trough garden, a sculpture garden, a rose garden and a rill can also be enjoyed together with a snowdrop collection featuring over 700 varieties. The medieval fish ponds, their interconnecting canal and the existing lake have been restored and two new ones have been added. The garden is open on selected days throughout the year, they happily welcome individuals and groups. Please be advised the perimeter of the gardens is extensive with rough terrain in some parts, which may not be suitable for everyone.

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Kirby Hall

Corby

One of England's largest Elizabethan mansions, with intact Great Hall and state rooms, alongside magnificent grounds and rich decoration.

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Evenley Wood Garden

Brackley

This 60- acre woodland, rich with an unusual band of acid soil in Northamptonshire, is full of life and holds some unusual trees and shrubs

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Cottesbrooke Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Cottesbrooke is a wonderful Queen Anne house dating from 1702, set in delightful award winning gardens in rural Northamptonshire.

Prebendal Manor

Peterborough

The gardens were established to represent both the practical and decorative features that could be found in a high status garden between the 13th and 15th centuries. They are best seen in late May and June. The Grade-1 listed manor is the earliest surviving dwelling in Northamptonshire with a history dating back to the Anglo-Saxon period. Two of the prebendaries of this manor were closely connect to Richard III, only loosing their positions in court on his death.

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Castle Ashby Gardens

Northampton

Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the 7th Marquess of Northampton. Wander through its gardens, open 365 days of the year, and you are taking a walk through history. Set in the heart of a 10,000-acre estate, the 35 acres of extensive gardens are a combination of several styles including the romantic Italian Gardens, the unique Orangery and impressive Arboretum. The full Castle Ashby experience also involves a menagerie, children’s play area, plant centre, tea room and gift shop. The gardens date back to 1872 and house a large central pond, home to over one hundred fish and an abundance of water lilies. The majority of planted beds are made up of hardy varieties including eucalyptus, ficus, camellia and different varieties of fuchsia.

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Holdenby House

Northampton

Holdenby House has 20-acres of gardens set in stately lawns and hedge with several special features. There is an Elizabethan rose garden and a walled kitchen garden with the original Victorian greenhouses. The house now also has a tearoom and runs special event days through the year.

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Rockingham Castle

Market Harborough

Rockingham Castle has stood on this beautiful position in Rockingham forest for almost 950 years. Surrounding the castle are 18-acres of gardens that hold examples of all its 900-year history. There is something special to see all year round and there's a variety of flowering plants and trees on show.

Stoke Albany House

Market Harborough

Stoke Albany House is a traditional garden that has been brought up to date in a perfect English setting, situated in a picturesque landscape. The garden is furnished with fine trees, a long herbacious border of depth and variety, the owner's and gardener's pride and joy. Lawns and a traditional walled garden containing a potager with topiary, a grey garden, an avenue of Nepeta Sixhills Giant arched with Mme Alfred Carrier roses, a peaceful garden with a fountain and beautifully maintained greenhouse. There is also a Mediterranean garden, a rose parterre and an Autumn garden - ten acres in all.

Steane Park Gardens

Brackley

Steane Park Garden is approached via parkland, with an abundance of classic trees and a smattering of wild flowers. The sense of history is strong with a beautiful church, built by Thomas Crewe in 1620 adjacent to the lake and ancient stew ponds. The attractive formal gardens, governed by a stunning copper beech and a classic cedar of Lebanon, leads to a more relaxed wooded area next to the lake, with wandering paths, wild flowers and an amusing folly. The effect is one of rural peace and calm.

Dog-friendly gardens

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National Trust's Canons Ashby

Daventry

A tranquil Tudor manor house set in rare terraced gardens, with the 'antient' Dryden family at its heart.

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Lamport Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Although the size and location of the gardens have remained the same since they were first laid out, the design has changed significantly over the generations. In the 17th century, Sir Thomas Isham entrusted the development of the gardens to his land agent, Gilbert Clerke, while he was away in Europe. The surrounding banks and large wrought iron gates survive from this time. One of the main changes in the 18th century was in 1750, when Sir Edmund planted box edgings to seven groups of shrubs. All but one of these ‘rooms’ would later be removed in the twentieth century. It was the keen eye of Mary, Lady Isham in the 1820s and later the passion of her son Sir Charles, which gave the gardens their present layout. Sir Charles planted the Irish yews to create the Eagle Walk, so-called because it led to an aviary of eagle owls. He also created the Italian garden in front of the Drawing Room windows and planted the climbing wisteria which still thrives today. Sir Charles’ pride and joy however was his remarkable rockery. He began work on the rockery in 1847. Standing some 24 foot high, 90 foot long and 47 foot wide, it was built right up against the Hall so that Sir Charles could see it from his bedroom window. It was made to look like a miniature world, with tiny crevices and caves, and planted dwarf trees. The rockery was populated with gnomes around 1874 - the world’s first garden gnomes! - and they remained there happily until the death of Sir Charles when, according to legend, they were shot at with air rifles by his daughters! Although most were lost, one survived, and today can be seen inside the Hall. Today the gardens include extensive herbaceous borders and shrubbery walks containing some rare and interesting plants, providing year round interest. The Walled Garden was replanted in 2010 and is full of unusual tall perennial plants, many sourced from Piet Oudolf’s nursery in the Netherlands. A vibrant array of colour and variety of plants are intersected by gravelled pathways with hidden doors and relaxing benches to be found. To the south-west of the Church lies the corner spinney which has been brought back to life with the restoration of the paths and a summerhouse. The planting has been carefully chosen to complement the masses of snowdrops and other bulbs and to remain in keeping with the essentially wild nature of the woodland garden.

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Evenley Wood Garden

Brackley

This 60- acre woodland, rich with an unusual band of acid soil in Northamptonshire, is full of life and holds some unusual trees and shrubs

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Delapre Park and Delapré Abbey Walled Garden

Northampton

The Abbey is set within the remains of the formal and semi-formal gardens which were once the pride and joy of the Tate and Bouverie families. There’s a large walled garden, superb specimen trees in the understated arboretum; the hidden remains of a splendid water garden, and the south lawn which stretches out to the ha-ha, which separates the lawn from the 500 acres of the wider parkland and the golf course beyond. There’s so much to see from the colourful flowers to the ancient trees and mature shrubs carefully tended by the gardener, grounds maintenance teams and of course the many volunteers. In the wider parkland, Visitos can enjoy a stroll around Delapre Lake and see the local wildlife on the way.

Kelmarsh Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Within the 18th century setting, the gardens that visitors see at Kelmarsh Hall today are largely inspired by Nancy Lancaster. She extended her interior style of shabby chic charm into the gardens and drafted in the garden designer of her day, the talented Norah Lindsay, to help. Around the Hall the landscape architect Geoffrey Jellicoe laid out a formal terrace.

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Kirby Hall

Corby

One of England's largest Elizabethan mansions, with intact Great Hall and state rooms, alongside magnificent grounds and rich decoration.

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Castle Ashby Gardens

Northampton

Castle Ashby is the ancestral home of the 7th Marquess of Northampton. Wander through its gardens, open 365 days of the year, and you are taking a walk through history. Set in the heart of a 10,000-acre estate, the 35 acres of extensive gardens are a combination of several styles including the romantic Italian Gardens, the unique Orangery and impressive Arboretum. The full Castle Ashby experience also involves a menagerie, children’s play area, plant centre, tea room and gift shop. The gardens date back to 1872 and house a large central pond, home to over one hundred fish and an abundance of water lilies. The majority of planted beds are made up of hardy varieties including eucalyptus, ficus, camellia and different varieties of fuchsia.

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Rockingham Castle

Market Harborough

Rockingham Castle has stood on this beautiful position in Rockingham forest for almost 950 years. Surrounding the castle are 18-acres of gardens that hold examples of all its 900-year history. There is something special to see all year round and there's a variety of flowering plants and trees on show.

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Holdenby House

Northampton

Holdenby House has 20-acres of gardens set in stately lawns and hedge with several special features. There is an Elizabethan rose garden and a walled kitchen garden with the original Victorian greenhouses. The house now also has a tearoom and runs special event days through the year.

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Boughton House

Kettering

Boughton House is often referred to as ‘The English Versailles’ and is home to a large collection of furniture, tapestries, art, and other fine pieces of history. Access to the house is available and the gardens have recently been renovated and redesigned.

National Trust's Lyveden

Lyveden

At the heart of Lyveden is the Elizabethan lodge and moated garden. Beyond you will discover Sir Thomas Tresham’s orchard, abandoned in 1605. Now restored it is home to a variety of heritage trees; apple, pear, damson, plum and cherry.

Stoke Albany House

Market Harborough

Stoke Albany House is a traditional garden that has been brought up to date in a perfect English setting, situated in a picturesque landscape. The garden is furnished with fine trees, a long herbacious border of depth and variety, the owner's and gardener's pride and joy. Lawns and a traditional walled garden containing a potager with topiary, a grey garden, an avenue of Nepeta Sixhills Giant arched with Mme Alfred Carrier roses, a peaceful garden with a fountain and beautifully maintained greenhouse. There is also a Mediterranean garden, a rose parterre and an Autumn garden - ten acres in all.

Highlights this month

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Quinton Old Rectory Garden

Quinton

A tranquil and thoughtfully-designed private garden.

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Elton Hall & Gardens

Cambridgeshire

An immaculate collection of formal gardens.

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Deene Park

Near Corby

Elegant country manor and estate with tea room.

Rhododendrons

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Cottesbrooke Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Cottesbrooke is a wonderful Queen Anne house dating from 1702, set in delightful award winning gardens in rural Northamptonshire.

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Deene Park

Near Corby

Elegant country manor and estate with tea room.

Garden image

Delapre Park and Delapré Abbey Walled Garden

Northampton

The Abbey is set within the remains of the formal and semi-formal gardens which were once the pride and joy of the Tate and Bouverie families. There’s a large walled garden, superb specimen trees in the understated arboretum; the hidden remains of a splendid water garden, and the south lawn which stretches out to the ha-ha, which separates the lawn from the 500 acres of the wider parkland and the golf course beyond. There’s so much to see from the colourful flowers to the ancient trees and mature shrubs carefully tended by the gardener, grounds maintenance teams and of course the many volunteers. In the wider parkland, Visitos can enjoy a stroll around Delapre Lake and see the local wildlife on the way.

Garden image

Evenley Wood Garden

Brackley

This 60- acre woodland, rich with an unusual band of acid soil in Northamptonshire, is full of life and holds some unusual trees and shrubs

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Lamport Hall & Gardens

Northampton

Although the size and location of the gardens have remained the same since they were first laid out, the design has changed significantly over the generations. In the 17th century, Sir Thomas Isham entrusted the development of the gardens to his land agent, Gilbert Clerke, while he was away in Europe. The surrounding banks and large wrought iron gates survive from this time. One of the main changes in the 18th century was in 1750, when Sir Edmund planted box edgings to seven groups of shrubs. All but one of these ‘rooms’ would later be removed in the twentieth century. It was the keen eye of Mary, Lady Isham in the 1820s and later the passion of her son Sir Charles, which gave the gardens their present layout. Sir Charles planted the Irish yews to create the Eagle Walk, so-called because it led to an aviary of eagle owls. He also created the Italian garden in front of the Drawing Room windows and planted the climbing wisteria which still thrives today. Sir Charles’ pride and joy however was his remarkable rockery. He began work on the rockery in 1847. Standing some 24 foot high, 90 foot long and 47 foot wide, it was built right up against the Hall so that Sir Charles could see it from his bedroom window. It was made to look like a miniature world, with tiny crevices and caves, and planted dwarf trees. The rockery was populated with gnomes around 1874 - the world’s first garden gnomes! - and they remained there happily until the death of Sir Charles when, according to legend, they were shot at with air rifles by his daughters! Although most were lost, one survived, and today can be seen inside the Hall. Today the gardens include extensive herbaceous borders and shrubbery walks containing some rare and interesting plants, providing year round interest. The Walled Garden was replanted in 2010 and is full of unusual tall perennial plants, many sourced from Piet Oudolf’s nursery in the Netherlands. A vibrant array of colour and variety of plants are intersected by gravelled pathways with hidden doors and relaxing benches to be found. To the south-west of the Church lies the corner spinney which has been brought back to life with the restoration of the paths and a summerhouse. The planting has been carefully chosen to complement the masses of snowdrops and other bulbs and to remain in keeping with the essentially wild nature of the woodland garden.

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