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Woburn Abbey Gardens

Bedfordshire

The refurbishment project is well underway despite the impact of Covid-19 on progress and the many inevitable new discoveries and complications that have come to light. Increased works have meant that the anticipated reopening will now take place in spring 2022, not 2021, as previously expected. The extended works also mean that the Woburn Abbey Garden Show held in June each year has also been postponed; the next Woburn Abbey Garden Show will take place on Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th June 2022. Woburn Abbey Gardens was designed by landscape designer Humphry Repton. He created his Red Book for Woburn in 1805. In it he made a series of watercolour paintings of the gardens, with watercolour flaps overlaying the original landscape paintings, to show his suggested improvements. The award-winning Abbey Gardens are halfway through a 25-year restoration program using the Red Book Repton made for Woburn as a guide. Garden features include: The Children’s Garden, recreated from original plans from 200 years ago; The Folly; The Bog Garden which changes with the seasons due to fluctuating water levels; The award-winning Rockery topped by its Chinese Pavilion; The Kitchen Garden; The Cedar of Lebanon tree planted in the later part of the 18th century; The Doric Temple; The Camellia House designed by Jeffry Wyatt in 1822 to house the 6th Duke’s collection of plants; The Aviary a recreation from the 1830s that was part of the menagerie originally designed by Repton; The Cone House and The Hornbeam Maze. Woburn Abbey and Gardens looks forwards to welcoming back visitors in spring 2022. "

Kathy Brown's Garden

Bedford

A colourful and textured garden crafted with devotion.

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Moggerhanger Park

Moggerhanger

A Grade I listed Georgian house nestled in a Humphry Repton designed garden and woodland.

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The Swiss Garden at Shuttleworth

Biggleswade

Iconic Alpine landscape with eccentric garden structures.

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Wrest Park

Bedfordshire

This is one of the most magnificent yet least well-know gardens in England. Unlike 'Capability' Brown’s natural landscape styling, favoured during the late 18th century, Wrest Park’s formal gardens provide a fascinating history of gardening styles, laid out over 150 years and inspired by the great gardens of Versailles in France. The gardens are overlooked by a stylish French-style 18th century mansion and contain wonderful garden buildings.

King's Arms Garden

Bedford

Small woodland garden of about 1½ acres created by plantsman the late William Nourish. Trees, shrubs, bulbs, many interesting collections and a pond.

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Luton Hoo Estate Walled Garden

Luton

The Walled Garden at Luton Hoo Estate was designed by Capability Brown in the late 1760's for John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, noted Botanist and Prime Minister under George III. The Garden changed and evolved under owners and management to match the fashion of horticulture in the 19th and 20th centuries, with each owner leaving their mark on the garden's rich history. Unfortunately, the garden fell into decline in the late 1970's, becoming dilapidated, overgrown and neglected. In 2001 a project began to research the history of the Walled Garden and its importance in Victorian and Edwardian society. This marked the beginning of a new era for the Walled Garden, which is now the focus of a fascinating project. The Walled Garden Project is largely carried out by an enthusiastic team of gardeners, researchers and historians who work alongside a restoration and conservation team, and a vibrant education team - all dedicated volunteers working towards a bright future whilst continuing to reveal a rich history. Today the site comprises a five-acre garden surrounded by the original 18th century octagonal wall, and a range of glass houses, including a timber framed Mackenzie Moncur conservatory dated circa 1911, a vinery and a further glasshouse on the diaphragm wall. There is also a selection of rare service buildings surrounding the garden including the Head Gardener's office, a potting shed, a boiler house, stables and propagation houses. The garden continues to be revived, repaired and re-imagined for the enjoyment of all.

Stockwood Discovery Centre Gardens

Bedfordshire

Stockwood Discovery Centre is a paradise for garden enthusiasts and one of the few places in the country where the work of acclaimed artist Ian Hamilton Finlay can be seen on permanent display. Each area in the garden has a special focus and even in winter visitors can enjoy the grounds.

Tofte Manor Gardens

Bedfordshire

A stunning holistically inspired venue with beautiful landscaped gardens and labyrinth set in Bedfordshire.

Dog-friendly gardens

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Moggerhanger Park

Moggerhanger

A Grade I listed Georgian house nestled in a Humphry Repton designed garden and woodland.

Garden image

Wrest Park

Bedfordshire

This is one of the most magnificent yet least well-know gardens in England. Unlike 'Capability' Brown’s natural landscape styling, favoured during the late 18th century, Wrest Park’s formal gardens provide a fascinating history of gardening styles, laid out over 150 years and inspired by the great gardens of Versailles in France. The gardens are overlooked by a stylish French-style 18th century mansion and contain wonderful garden buildings.

Garden image

Luton Hoo Estate Walled Garden

Luton

The Walled Garden at Luton Hoo Estate was designed by Capability Brown in the late 1760's for John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, noted Botanist and Prime Minister under George III. The Garden changed and evolved under owners and management to match the fashion of horticulture in the 19th and 20th centuries, with each owner leaving their mark on the garden's rich history. Unfortunately, the garden fell into decline in the late 1970's, becoming dilapidated, overgrown and neglected. In 2001 a project began to research the history of the Walled Garden and its importance in Victorian and Edwardian society. This marked the beginning of a new era for the Walled Garden, which is now the focus of a fascinating project. The Walled Garden Project is largely carried out by an enthusiastic team of gardeners, researchers and historians who work alongside a restoration and conservation team, and a vibrant education team - all dedicated volunteers working towards a bright future whilst continuing to reveal a rich history. Today the site comprises a five-acre garden surrounded by the original 18th century octagonal wall, and a range of glass houses, including a timber framed Mackenzie Moncur conservatory dated circa 1911, a vinery and a further glasshouse on the diaphragm wall. There is also a selection of rare service buildings surrounding the garden including the Head Gardener's office, a potting shed, a boiler house, stables and propagation houses. The garden continues to be revived, repaired and re-imagined for the enjoyment of all.

National Trust's Sharpenhoe

Bedford

Ancient woodland and chalk escarpment with fantastic views.

Highlights this month

Stockwood Discovery Centre Gardens

Bedfordshire

Stockwood Discovery Centre is a paradise for garden enthusiasts and one of the few places in the country where the work of acclaimed artist Ian Hamilton Finlay can be seen on permanent display. Each area in the garden has a special focus and even in winter visitors can enjoy the grounds.

Garden image

Kathy Brown's Garden

Bedford

A colourful and textured garden crafted with devotion.

Garden image

Moggerhanger Park

Moggerhanger

A Grade I listed Georgian house nestled in a Humphry Repton designed garden and woodland.

Wildflower Meadows

Garden image

Kathy Brown's Garden

Bedford

A colourful and textured garden crafted with devotion.

Garden image

Luton Hoo Estate Walled Garden

Luton

The Walled Garden at Luton Hoo Estate was designed by Capability Brown in the late 1760's for John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute, noted Botanist and Prime Minister under George III. The Garden changed and evolved under owners and management to match the fashion of horticulture in the 19th and 20th centuries, with each owner leaving their mark on the garden's rich history. Unfortunately, the garden fell into decline in the late 1970's, becoming dilapidated, overgrown and neglected. In 2001 a project began to research the history of the Walled Garden and its importance in Victorian and Edwardian society. This marked the beginning of a new era for the Walled Garden, which is now the focus of a fascinating project. The Walled Garden Project is largely carried out by an enthusiastic team of gardeners, researchers and historians who work alongside a restoration and conservation team, and a vibrant education team - all dedicated volunteers working towards a bright future whilst continuing to reveal a rich history. Today the site comprises a five-acre garden surrounded by the original 18th century octagonal wall, and a range of glass houses, including a timber framed Mackenzie Moncur conservatory dated circa 1911, a vinery and a further glasshouse on the diaphragm wall. There is also a selection of rare service buildings surrounding the garden including the Head Gardener's office, a potting shed, a boiler house, stables and propagation houses. The garden continues to be revived, repaired and re-imagined for the enjoyment of all.

Garden image

Moggerhanger Park

Moggerhanger

A Grade I listed Georgian house nestled in a Humphry Repton designed garden and woodland.

Garden image

Woburn Abbey Gardens

Bedfordshire

The refurbishment project is well underway despite the impact of Covid-19 on progress and the many inevitable new discoveries and complications that have come to light. Increased works have meant that the anticipated reopening will now take place in spring 2022, not 2021, as previously expected. The extended works also mean that the Woburn Abbey Garden Show held in June each year has also been postponed; the next Woburn Abbey Garden Show will take place on Saturday 25th and Sunday 26th June 2022. Woburn Abbey Gardens was designed by landscape designer Humphry Repton. He created his Red Book for Woburn in 1805. In it he made a series of watercolour paintings of the gardens, with watercolour flaps overlaying the original landscape paintings, to show his suggested improvements. The award-winning Abbey Gardens are halfway through a 25-year restoration program using the Red Book Repton made for Woburn as a guide. Garden features include: The Children’s Garden, recreated from original plans from 200 years ago; The Folly; The Bog Garden which changes with the seasons due to fluctuating water levels; The award-winning Rockery topped by its Chinese Pavilion; The Kitchen Garden; The Cedar of Lebanon tree planted in the later part of the 18th century; The Doric Temple; The Camellia House designed by Jeffry Wyatt in 1822 to house the 6th Duke’s collection of plants; The Aviary a recreation from the 1830s that was part of the menagerie originally designed by Repton; The Cone House and The Hornbeam Maze. Woburn Abbey and Gardens looks forwards to welcoming back visitors in spring 2022. "

Garden image

Wrest Park

Bedfordshire

This is one of the most magnificent yet least well-know gardens in England. Unlike 'Capability' Brown’s natural landscape styling, favoured during the late 18th century, Wrest Park’s formal gardens provide a fascinating history of gardening styles, laid out over 150 years and inspired by the great gardens of Versailles in France. The gardens are overlooked by a stylish French-style 18th century mansion and contain wonderful garden buildings.

Garden image

The Swiss Garden at Shuttleworth

Biggleswade

Iconic Alpine landscape with eccentric garden structures.

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